Community Education

Class Supply Lists

 

Arts & Crafts

Painting with Acrylics

Ellen Hansen
541-730-5470
gleehansen@gmail.com

  1.  Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


    1. Acrylic Paint in the tube: Cadmium Red, Cadmium Yellow, Ultramarine blue, White, Sap green or Hookers Green, Yellow Ocher, Raw Sienna and Burnt Sienna. 4 oz tubes of paint are recommended as you will use a lot of paint and the small tubes in the sets do not provide enough paint for the entire class. 

    2. Water container, at least 8 cup size, can be left over plastic bowl.

    3. Paper towels.

    4. Brushes; bristle or synthetic, ½” flat and numbers 8 and 12 round.

    5. Palette knife; plastic or metal.

    6. Palette; can be anything white and firm to put your paint on; such as a white plate, styrofoam meat tray, plastic cool whip lid.  

    7. Plastic bag to put your palette in; can be ziplock or other.

    8. Mister bottle.

    9. Canvas paper, 9” X 12” or canvas boards, 8” X 10” or canvases.

    10. If using canvas paper, something to staple your canvas paper to, such as: foam board, thick poster board or cardboard.

    11. Pencil and acrylic erasure.

    12. Table top easel if you like working on an easel but not required.   

    13. Rubber gloves if you don’t like getting paint on your hands, but acrylic washes off easily with soap and water.

    14. Old shirt or apron if you don’t want to get paint on your clothes. 

    15. Drop cloth for the table; can be large plastic trash bag or plastic tablecloth. 


    Please call or email me if you have any questions about the class or supplies. 




    Art Supply Sources


    The Frame House                                    Art Department Inc

    434 W. 1st Ave                                         254 Commercial St NE 

    Albany, OR 97321                                   Salem, OR 97301

    541-928-7676                                           503-364-7465


    Michael’s                                                 Hobby Lobby

    Corvallis, OR                                            Heritage Mall

                                                                       Albany, Oregon   

    Fred Meyer’s

    Albany, OR


    Oregon Art Supply                                 The Merri Artist

    1020 Pearl St.                                          421 NE 3rd St

    Eugene, OR 97401                                 McMinnville, OR 97128

    1-866-683-2787                                     503-472-1684

    www.oregonartsupply.com


    Dick Blick Art Supplies

    www.dickblick.com


    Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff

    www.cheapjoes.com

Pastel Painting

Ellen Hansen
gleehansen@gmail.com

541-730-5470

 

 

 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

  1. Basic set of soft stick pastels, preferably artist quality, that include the following colors: ultramarine blue, prussian blue, cerulean blue, purple, light purple, cadmium red, light red of some kind, an orange, yellow ochre, a dark and a light yellow, olive green, sap green, yellow green, grey green, blue grey, a medium grey, burnt umber, raw umber and burnt sienna.

  2. Canson Mi-Teintes paper Pad-24 sheets assorted colors 12X16 inches.  

  3. One of two pieces of 140 lb Arches watercolor paper 12X16 inches.

  4. Two hard pastel pencils,  one dark and one light in color for drawing your subject onto your paper. 

  5. Watercolors of your choice and watercolor brushes. 

  6. Kneaded eraser.

  7. Soft brush, you can use a makeup brush that you purchase at the Dollar store if you like. 

  8. Masking tape and something to tape your pastel paper onto like foam board.  

  9. A plastic table cloth or something to put under you to catch the pastel dust as you work as soft pastels are messy.  

  10. Something to keep your pastels in if they do not come in a container. You want to keep the colors separate. You might consider an egg carton. 

  11. Workable spray fixative.  This is optional but you might find it makes working a little easier.  

  12. An exacto knife for sgraffito effects.  

  13. Pastels can be combined with oil pastels, acrylics, oil paints, charcoals, watercolors and gouache and probably other mediums I haven’t mentioned such as, caran d’ ache.  If you have any of these then we will be discussing how to combine soft pastels with these other mediums.   

 

I have found Merri Artist to have the best prices and very fast turn around when you order online or over the phone.   Merri Artist is located in McMinnville if you would like to go and visit the store in person. 

 

Dick Blick has a large selection of soft pastels, paper, and pastel pencils and the prices are not that much more than Merri Artist. They usually take about a week to 10 days to deliver the order once you place the order online.   There is a Dick Blick store in Beaverton and in Portland. 

 

It looked to me as if Michaels’s prices were so high that even with a coupon you would be paying a lot more for the pastel sets than if you were to purchase them from Merri Artist or Dick Blick.  So I can’t recommend Michael’s. And I don’t know what they carry in stock in the store.  

 

Hobby Lobby only has their brand, Master’s Touch, of pastels. These are inexpensive but they are not artist quality. If you are not sure if you are going to be doing pastels in the future, you might try the Master's Touch brand. Hobby Lobby also carries the Canson Mi-Teintes paper.  Be sure and use your 40% off coupon or wait until all Master’s Touch art supplies go on sale for 50% off which they do once a month.  

 

Please call or email me if you have any questions about supplies for this class. 

Sincerely,

Ellen Hansen 

See header for contact information  

 

Folded Book Art

 

Instructor:  Leah Hansen

Email:  lippin34@gmail.com

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

List of supplies (to get you started)

  • A few books to up-cycle

  • Sharp blade for cutting paper

  • String, twine, or fishing line

  • A few assorted beads or buttons of different sizes

Drawing for Fun

Vikki Nazarenus

nazarev@linnbenton.edu

  1. Suggested supplies:  

    • Drawing pencil – or large primary pencil (fat pencil that kids learn to write with-much cheaper!)

    • Kneadable eraser – usually gray – FABER CASTELL

    • Colored pencils -  Prismacolor, Dick Blick, Steatler, Arteza

    • Elegant Writers – 

    • Pencil Sharpener – 

    • Box of crayons – need not be new.



    You don’t need all of these supplies the first week.  (Art is an expensive habit!)   You will need the regular pencil, eraser and sharpener the first four/five weeks of class. I would suggest going to Hobby Lobby or Michael’s once a week and use the 40% coupon for the items as you want them or need them, rather than buying all at once.  And if you already have the supplies – bring what you have.

     

     


     

     

    Syllabus:

     

    Lesson 1:  Introductions – getting acquainted.  Discussing technology and teaching/learning on Zoom.  Elements and principles of art.   Finding the simple in the complicated.  Creating forms out of shapes – creating the optical illusion of 3D on a 2D surface.  Drawing forms, Using value to create forms.  Learning about light and shade.  Resources for students.  Project:  3D worksheet, apple drawing.

     

    Lesson 2:  Making your pencil talk – the importance of value, pattern, textures, etc. Discussing Kathe Kollowitz as an example of making a statement.  Value scales and ways of creating different values. (cross hatch, stippling, edge of pencil+). Project:  Value scale and  Quail pencil drawing.

     

    Lesson 3:  “Learning to draw means learning to see.” (echo from my high school art teacher)

    Drawing from a black and white photo.  Project: ¼ divisions of photo to drawing.  Creating the same values.

     

    Lesson 4:  “Draw what you see, not what you think you see.”  Project:  Grid drawing from a photo.

     

    Lesson5:  Composition – putting it all together (organizing the elements and principles), focal point, reading/analyzing a work of art.  Creating your own composition from collage pieces.  Using a viewfinder and creating an abstract drawing.

     

    Lesson 6:  Portraits and People.  Learning about proportions used for drawing people and portraits.  Using different kinds of gesture drawings to capture movement or record ideas.  Project:  Self Portrait in pencil

     

    Lesson 7:  Exploring other media - Elegant Markers and different drawing methods.  Contour drawings, blind contour, mass. Etc.  Negative and Positive space.  Project: Negative space tree drawing.

     

    Lesson 8: Exploring other media – colored pencils.  Discussion of how colored pencils are different from “regular” pencils.  Project:  Floral drawing/still life

Color & Design Studio

Mark Allison
541-752-0641
allisom@q.com

The basic materials can simply be a pencil (standard yellow Ticonderoga pencils are great), a white plastic eraser, and a shader. That will work for the entire class.

Places to find these items locally include LBCC bookstore, Office Max, OSU Bookstore, Fred Myers, etc.

I prefer heavier (24 lb.) bond paper because it’s smooth, takes pencil very well, erases easily and is a size that fits standard plastic sheet protectors. I collect my drawings in a binder in sheet protectors. I find this is a better option than using a sketchbook, but sketchbooks are fine too.

If you have artists pencils that are marked with different lead hardness/softness what you should bring are the pencils marked “B,” and “2B.” Avoid the hard engineering pencils marked H, 2H, etc.

The eraser stick pictured (Tuff Stuff by PaperMate or Sanford) is no longer manufactured under that name. It’s now made by a company called “Factis.” Available from Dick Blick or Utrecht Art supply online and locally from OSU Bookstore (which also has the newer, even smaller eraser stick called “Mono Zero” from Japan.

Expressive Water Media

Mark Allison
541-752-0641
allisom@q.com

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have for the following classes:  Expressive Water Media, Beginning Painting, Exploring Art Styles.

 

  • You only need ONE MEDIUM for any of my classes, either watercolor or acrylic. If you're just starting out I recommend watercolor as your first medium because of ease of use and lower cost. 

 

  • WAIT FOR THE FIRST CLASS INSTRUCTIONS before putting any watercolor paint into your Pike Watercolor Palette, or acrylic into your Masterson Palette Seal. 

 

  • Ignore (recycle) the instruction sheet that comes with the Pike Palette, using that info will damage your palette. 

 

  • I've done extensive testing on all the colors on these lists and they are all "lightfast rated" at level I or II. Lightfast means resistant to fading when exposed to UV light (sunlight, fluorescents).

 

  • The colors and palette and paper are less expensive at Blick Art Materials, also known as dickblick.com

 

  •  Brushes and spray bottles are good buys at Michael’s on 9th St. in Corvallis.

 

WATERCOLORS

Cotman brand, 8 ml tubes:

  1. Alizarin Crimson Hue
  2. Cad Orange Hue
  3. Cad Red Pale Hue
  4. Cad Yel Hue
  5. Intense Pthalo Blue
  6. Viridian Hue
  7. Lemon Yellow Hue (you’ll need two 8ml OR one 21 ml of lemon yel.)
  8. Cotman brand, 21 ml tubes
  9. Lemon Yellow Hue
  10. Ultramarine Blue
  11. Permanent Rose

 

WATERCOLOR PALETTE: Pike Palette (Original, 20 wells) - This is the only palette I can recommend. The next best thing if you can’t afford this one is two clean unused “25-P” styrofoam meat trays from Fred Meyers butcher. They can be hinged together with packing tape.

 

WATERCOLOR PAPER: Arches 140# Cold Press 100% cotton. I will have pre-cut 1/8 sheets (7.5x11”) to sell in class for $1 per sheet, both sides are usable. Please do NOT buy any other type of “watercolor” paper. There is a huge difference in how these papers perform, visible even to my granddaughter when she was four years old! Please only buy Arches cold press 100% cotton for watercolor.

_________________________

 

ACRYLIC COLORS

Liquitex colors (one each of the following):

  1. Yellow Light Hansa
  2. Quinacridone Magenta 2 oz or 59 ml
  3. Pthalo Blue (Grn. Shade) 59 ml
  4. Pthalo Green (Blu. Shade) 59 ml
  5. Utramarine Blue (Gr. Shade) 59 ml
  6. Dioxazine Purple 59 ml
  7. Napthol Crimson 59 ml
  8. Alizarin Crimson Hue Perm. 59 ml
  9. Titanium White 4.65 oz. or 138 ml (this is a larger tube because you need more white that any other color)

 

Utrecht colors (one each of the following):

  1. Hansa yellow med = Medium Yellow 2 oz or 59 ml 6.13
  2. Napthol red light = Cad Red Lt Hue 2 oz or 59 ml 6.13

 

For Acrylic painters: Masterson Palette Seal 1 3/4x16x12” 

  • This is a sealable palette which can keep your acrylic paint wet and usable for weeks. Get the one with the blue lid, the other (red) one has a sponge layer and palette paper which are not needed.

 

PALETTE KNIFE: for Acrylic painters. Get one #10 Steel Palette Knife (has a broad teardrop shaped blade), for mixing paint in your palette. (Michael’s or Blick). Don’t get the cheaper plastic ones, they’re fragile and don’t have a sharp enough edge to scrape dried paint out of your palette.

 

I recommend the Arches for Acrylic painters as well. You can paint directly on this “paper” without priming with gesso. But other supports work with acrylic as well: museum matboard (scraps may be purchased from a frame shop, Pegasus Gallery on 2nd St. has them packaged for sale.) Acrylic may also be painted on canvas paper, or canvas boards, or stretched canvas. Blick sells a nice product for acrylic or oil painters: “Blick Studio Canvas Pad 9x12”, 10 sheets of real canvas, triple primed w gesso.”

__________________________

 

For BOTH Watercolor painters AND Acrylic painters:

PUMP SPRAYER - Holbein Watercolor Atomizer Bottle (from Blick) or an 8 oz. “Artist’s Loft” spray bottle from Michael’s. This is a fine-mist sprayer, not the harsher plant sprayer.

MASKING TAPE: buy at Fred Meyers paint department. #2050 (red core) Painter’s Masking Tape, 1 inch wide (.94 in.) Please don’t buy the cheaper generic masking tapes, the adhesive breaks down and leave a sticky residue on your paper.

 

BRUSHES for WATERCOLOR and ACRYLIC (from Michael’s on 9th St., Corvallis. Look for these in the economy acrylic brush section)

1/2” Brush: Royal & Langnickel Soft Grip, Level 1, 1/2” Shader

3/4” Brush: Royal & Langnickel Soft Grip, Level 1, 3/4” Wash

______________________________

 

OIL PAINTERS: get the color equivalents of the acrylic list of colors. 

 

You can also use the Masterson Palette Seal but might want to buy a pad of palette paper to go inside the Masterson Palette Seal. 

 

Solvent: Turpenoid Natural ONLY. No mineral spirits, No turpentine in the classroom.

 

Supports: “Blick Studio Canvas Pad 9x12”, 10 sheets of real canvas, triple primed w gesso.” or canvas panels (9x12”), or gesso-primed matboard or gesso-primed watercolor paper. Arches makes a paper for oil painters: called “OIL” - it’s pre-primed, available from Blick. A few different styles and sizes of palette knives. Bristle brushes are stiff and appropriate for the direct technique that I teach. I use a variety of sizes of brights and filbert type bristle brushes.

______________________________


ALL PAINTERS: stack of bond paper (copier paper), pencils, erasers (white, magic rub type).

Realistic Drawing

Mark Allison
541-752-0641
allisom@q.com

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have for the following classes: Realistic Drawing, and Figure Drawing & Painting 

 


The items shown here are my favorites but the basic materials can simply be:

  1.  a pencil (standard yellow Ticonderoga pencils are great)

  2. a white plastic eraser

  3. a shader


That will work for the entire class.


Places to find these items locally include LBCC bookstore, Office Max, OSU Bookstore, Fred

Myers, etc.


  1. I prefer heavier (24 lb.) bond paper because it’s smooth, takes pencil very well, erases easily and is a size that fits standard plastic sheet protectors. 

  2. I collect my drawings in a binder in sheet protectors. I find this is a better option than using a sketchbook, but sketchbooks are fine too.

  3. If you have artists pencils that are marked with different lead hardness/softness what you should bring are the pencils marked “B,” and “2B.” Avoid the hard engineering pencils marked H, 2H, etc.

  4. The eraser stick pictured (Tuff Stuff by PaperMate or Sanford) is no longer manufactured under that name. It’s now made by a company called “Factis.” Available from Dick Blick or Utrecht Art supply online and locally from OSU Bookstore (which also has the newer, even smaller eraser stick called “Mono Zero” from Japan.

The Art of Mono Printing

Peggy Joyce

Email:  joycep@linnbenton.edu

 


 

 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

List of supplies 

  • Acrylic Paints

    • Essentials:  blue, yellow, red, white, black

    • Optional:  4 or 5 of your favorite colors

  • 4” brayer (hard rubber is recommended)

  • printing plate - (Gel Press brand recommended) any size up to an 8x10

  • white paper for pulling prints - 40# or heavier gm recommended (Neenah 90# available on Amazon)

  • stencils of your choice

  • baby wipes

  • paper towels

  • color wheel

 

Beginner’s kit available from instructor $25 - includes 5x7 Gel Press plate, 4” brayer, 2 stencils, & color wheel. Contact instructor for pickup instructions.

 

 

Beginning Watercolor Painting

Vikki Nazarenus

nazarev@linnbenton.edu

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

Paint

  • 3 tubes (colors) can get you by:  Ultramarine Blue, Cadmium Red, Cadmium Yellow can mix all the other colors 

  • Recommended brands:  Windsor Newton professional grade, Grumbacher artist quality, Dick Blick Artist Quality, Daniel Smith artist quality, M.Graham, Turner

Later additions:  New Gamboge, Raw Sienna, Burnt Sienna, Alizarin Crimson, 

Windsor Blue, Sap green, Payne’s Gray, Indigo and Sepia

 

Brushes

  • Round – size 4, 8 and 12

  • Flat -  1/2” flat brush 

  • Rigger or script brush

  • Suggested brands:  Princeton, Windsor Newton, Danube, Black Velvet

NO - Master’s Touch

 

Pencil and kneadable eraser

 

Paper- 140lb cold press watercolor paper – D’Arches brand.  Don’t get cheap paper!

Individual sheets are best, Block is ok

 

Foam board - 1//2 thick

 

Palette – white – can be top of whip cream container, white plate, enamel pan, plastic lid, egg plate

 

Palette knife

 

2 containers for water – can be plastic containers, glasses

 

Masking Fluid (Liquid Frisket) - Incredible White Mask recommended + cheap brush

 

Frisket Lifter 

 

ADDITIONAL SUPPLIES: (the dollar store can be your friend)

  • Masking tape

  • White, (not printed) paper towels or shop towels

  • Sketch book (copy paper will do)

  • Spray bottle

  • salt shaker

  • cellophane

  • dish soap

  • old plastic card, razor blade, drinking straw, old toothbrush,

  • sea sponges – look for interesting textures

  • drinking straw and/or coffee stirring stick

  • white acrylic paint (inexpensive)

  • small pliers or nutcracker

  • magic eraser – plain, without soap

  • eye dropper

  • scissors

  • Container(s) to keep it all in

Advanced Watercolor & Water Media

 

Ellen Hansen

 

gleehansen@gmail.com

541-730-5470

 

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


  1. Watercolor paints: Indigo, *Ultramarine Blue, *Cadmium Red, *Cadmium Yellow, Raw Umber, Burnt Sienna, Sap Green, Alizarin Crimson Hue, Yellow Ochre, and Chinese White

  2. Small (size 4), Medium (size8) and Large (size 12) round watercolor brushes.

  3. 140’ cold press paper watercolor paper.

  4. Pencil and art gum eraser.

  5. Foam board if not using Arches block paper. This is to secure your watercolor paper so that it does not buckle when wet. You will only need this by the 5th class. You can but the large piece of foam board in half for easier handling.

  6. Masking tape to secure watercolor paper to hard surface.

  7. Something for a palette, has to be white, like a top to whip cream or a white plate, not paper.

  8. Container for water, cottage cheese container will do.

  9. Large trash bag to use as drop cloth.

  10. Paper towels, just a few.

  11. Small sketch book or plain paper like copy paper for doing sketches.

  12. Box, bag or something to put it all in.


This is the recommended list of supplies. You really only have to have 

  1. a medium round (6 or 8) watercolor brush 

  2. 140 lb cold press watercolor paper

  3. a water container

  4. the red

  5. yellow

  6. blue tube watercolor paint (preferably at least student quality) pigment listed above, pencil

  7. paper

  8. erasure. 


All of the other while recommended can be purchased as you continue in the class if you prefer.


You may also want to have:

  1. Masking fluid Drinking straw

  2. Toothbrush Cheap brush to use with masking fluid

  3. Small Spray Bottle Mask pen

  4. Sketchbook Mask pick up

  5. Ruler White gouache or white acrylic paint

  6. Folder for handouts Sea sponge

  7. Elegant Writer, black, calligraphy pen Salt


* items are the only required colors.


A word about purchasing your watercolor supplies:

If you are not sure if you will continue doing watercolors or just want to take it slow, I recommend beginning with student grade watercolor supplies. You can always upgrade to artist quality gradually.


A good student grade watercolor paper is Strathmore 140 lb cold press paper and you can find that at Hobby Lobby, Fred Meyers and Michaels. You should probably purchase a size about 12" X 15". Good student grade watercolors are VanGogh found at Hobby Lobby or Cotman found at Michaels. You want to look for brushes that are medium priced and are a blend of natural and synthetic. Michael’s has Cotman and Robert Simmons which are both good quality brushes. I don't know if you can find Princeton or not in Albany or Corvallis, but if you can find Princeton 4050 they are good without being expensive. I know Dick Blick has them online.


If you want artist quality, Arches 140 lb cold press paper is excellent and you can find full sheets at Hobby Lobby. You can then cut these sheets down to the size you want, just be careful handling all watercolor paper as your fingers leave oil on the paper and shows up when you paint.


Windsor Newton is artist quality paint but very expensive. It can be found at Hobby Lobby and Michaels. M Graham is also artist quality paint and can be found at The Frame Shop on First Street as well as Arches paper.


Dick Blick, Daniel Smith, and American Journey and many other artist quality brands of watercolor paint are sold online as well as many other brands of paper and brushes.


Hope you find this helpful, but if you have any other questions regarding the class content or supplies, please call or email me.


I look forward to meeting you!



Nature Sketching In Your Backyard

Lauren Ohlgren

Email:  lsohlgren@gmail.com

 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

Supplies for first class:

  • Sketchbook

  • Pencils



Other supplies will be discussed at the first class.

 

The Harlem Renaissance

Julie Kahn

Email:  kahnj@linnbenton.edu

Suggested supplies: If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

List of supplies (to get you started)

  • drawing pencils

  • glue

  • 11x14 pad of mixed media paper

  • various acrylic paints

  • paintbrushes of varying sizes

Art as Propaganda

Julie Kahn

Email:  kahnj@linnbenton.edu


Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


List of supplies (to get you started)

  • drawing pencils

  • glue

  • 11x14 pad of mixed media paper

  • various acrylic paints

  • paintbrushes of varying sizes

Urban Sketching For Beginners

Lauren Ohlgren

Email:  lsohlgren@gmail.com

 


 

 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


Supplies for first class:

  • Sketchbook

  • Pencils



Other supplies will be discussed at the first class.

 

Advanced Mono Printing Techniques

Instructor:  Peggy Joyce

Email:  joycep@linnbenton.edu

 


 

 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.  Or you can reach out to the instructor.


List of supplies 

  • Acrylic Paints

    • Various colors of your choice

  • Gel printing plate 8x10 (or any size up to 8x10)

  • Various stencils

  • Book binders needle & linen thread (waxed preferred)

  • Brayers (4” & 2”)

  • Neenah paper stock #90 or any other weight between 40# and 90#

 

 

Computer Skills & Technology

MS Excel Basics

Microsoft Excel is essential for any business. This course enables you to learn basic MS Excel skills to manipulate data to produce useful and meaningful information for your business or your clients. You can put what you learn into practice.

 What you will learn:

  • Introduction to the Excel Workbook
  • Manipulation of data
  • Editing and formatting skills
  • Creating and using mathematical formulas to produce meaningful results
  • Working with basic Excel built-in functions to analyze data and perform calculations
  • Constructing charts and graphs in Excel.
  • Fundamentals of data analysis

Who this course is for:
If you are new to MS Excel or have limited skills of MS Excel, this course is for you. Step-by-step instructions are used throughout the course. Each session is fun-filled learning experience.

Requirements:
Some basic computer skills. Bring a flash drive (USB). 5 sessions, 2 hours each.

MS Excel for Business Data

This course helps you to turn data (or information) into better business decisions, which may increase your business productivity. You can put what you learn into practice.

What you will learn:

  • Methods of data analysis (graphical displays and statistics summaries)
  • Break-even analysis (for a project or business)
  • Using “IF” statements to create business price models
  • What if analysis (for managerial decision making)
  • Solver for finding optimal solutions for business decisions
  • Manipulation of PivotTable

Who this course is for:
This course is for you if you want to turn data or ideas into better business decisions, based on statistics. Step-by-step instructions are used throughout the course. Each session is fun-filled learning experience.

Requirements:
MS Excel basics. Bring a flash drive (USB). 5 sessions, 2 hours each.

Statistics for Business and Economic Data

This course helps managers and small business owners analyze business and economic data.  You will learn statistical software skills and statistical methods that help you make better business decisions.

Topics include descriptive statistics: statistical summary, graphical summary;  probability, expected value; and inferential statistics: discrete probability distributions, normal probability distribution, statistics for quality, simple linear regression model, multiple linear regression model, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and types of errors.

Requirements:
Working knowledge of Excel. Participants may also be required to use a more powerful professional statistical software package. Bring a flash drive (USB). 6 sessions, 2 hours each.

Who this course is for:
If you are a manager, or a person running a business, this course is for you. Step-by-step instructions are used throughout the course. Each session is fun-filled learning experience.

 

 

Food & Drink

Handmade Pasta

Adrienne Ewanchyna

Emailewancha@linnbenton.edu

 


 


Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


Let’s Make Pasta!


In this class, I will be demonstrating how to make pasta dough, how to roll and shape it, and how to make 2 quick and easy sauces.  

You can watch the class as a demonstration, and do the preparations on your own after, or you can try to cook along with me. 

If you’d like to cook along with me, there are some things you will need to prepare ahead:

  1. The pasta dough does need to rest for at least an hour before we work with it.  My suggestion is that we learn to make the dough together.  Let your pasta rest and just watch me while I show you how to roll and shape - and you can practice later after your pasta has rested.

  2. We will also be making 2 sauces.  Feel free to make them along with me!  If you don’t use them right away, you could reheat them when you have your own pasta (or feel free to cook some dry pasta this time!).  

  3. Some equipment that you might want to have on hand:

    1. Measuring cups (both liquid and dry) and spoons

    2. Bowl

    3. Fork

    4. Cutting board and knife

    5. Food processor (if you have one - - it’s OK if you don’t!  I’ll be showing you different ways to do things)

    6. Pasta roller or rolling pin (if you don’t have a rolling pin, a wine bottle or PVC pipe can work!)

    7. Baking sheet/cookie pan

    8. Pots, skillets, and slotted spoon

    9. Box grater or microplane

    10. Colander 

    11. Lemon juicer (if you don’t have this, your hand or a fork can work too)

    12. Sushi mat (if you have one)


I am really looking forward to making pasta with you all!  Of course, if you just want to sit back and watch, that is just fine too! 


Fresh Egg Pasta


4 eggs, lightly beaten

Approximately 2 - 3 cups all-purpose flour 

Pinch salt


You use approximately 1 egg per person per serving on average. 

  1.  By hand:  Option 1- Mound the flour and salt on a counter and create a large well in the center.  Pour the eggs into the well.  Using a fork, gradually stir bits of flour into the egg, a bit at a time until the flour begins to become incorporated.  The eggs may break out of the flour well, but try to work the dough together.  Eventually, you will need to use your hands to get the dough together. Use as much flour as you need to make a firm dough.  You may not use all of the flour.   When the dough comes together, gently knead the dough 7 - 10 minutes until it is very smooth and elastic.  The dough should not be sticky.  If you are hand rolling, it can be a little softer, but if you are running it through a pasta roller, it needs to be quite firm.

Option 2 -  In a large bowl, mound the flour and salt and create a large well in the center.  Pour the eggs into the well.  The bowl allows you to mix easier without the eggs escaping.  Using a fork, gradually stir bits of flour into the egg, a bit at a time until the flour begins to become incorporated.  Eventually, you will need to use your hands to get the dough together.  Use as much flour as you need to make a firm dough.  You may not use all of the flour.   When the dough comes together, gently knead the dough 7 - 10 minutes until it is very smooth and elastic.  The dough should not be sticky.  If you are hand rolling, it can be a little softer, but if you are running it through a pasta roller, it needs to be quite firm.

  1.  By food processor:  Place 2 cups of the flour and salt in a food processor and pour in the beaten eggs.  Pulse the food processor until the mixture looks much like couscous (small grains).  If it looks too wet, add more of the flour until it has the correct texture (couscous).  You should be able to squeeze it together with your hand and it would hold together.  If it is too dry, you can add an additional egg yolk or a little water.   Dump this mixture onto the counter and use your hands to bring it together.  When the dough comes together, gently knead the dough 5 minutes until it is very smooth and elastic.  The dough should not be sticky.  If you are hand rolling, it can be a little softer, but if you are running it through a pasta roller, it needs to be quite firm.   This method is best if you are rolling through a machine as you can get a dryer dough.


A little bit of water can be added if the mixture is too dry (and a whole egg would be too much moisture).  Opposite to that, if it is too wet, add more flour.  The moisture level of your flour, moisture in the air, along with the size of your eggs can impact how wet your dough can be.  Adjust accordingly!  


Eggless Pasta


1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup semolina flour

⅔ cup hot water

Pinch salt


Follow directions for the Egg Pasta.



Pasta with Brown Butter, Lemon & Parmesan


1 lb pasta

8 tbsp. Butter

1 lemon

4 oz parmesan, grated

Fresh grated pepper

Salt to taste


Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until very al dente - the pasta will finish cooking in the sauce.  

Meanwhile, melt 4 tbsp of the butter in a large heavy pot until it begins to turn a dark golden brown.  Scoop out 2 cups of the pasta cooking liquid and add 1 ½ cups to the butter (be careful of spattering).  Reserve the last ½ cup liquid.  Whisk in the remaining butter, 1 tbsp at a time until the sauce is emulsified and creamy.  

Drain the pasta and add to the sauce.  Allow the pasta to continue to cook in the sauce.   Zest the lemon.  Add the zest and the juice from the lemon to the pasta.  Season with salt and plenty of pepper. 

Toss with parmesan cheese.  If the sauce is too thin, add more pasta cooking liquid. 


Pasta Al Pomodoro


1 lb. pasta

¼ cup olive oil

1 medium onion, minced

4 garlic cloves, minced

Pinch red pepper flakes

1 - 28 oz. can peeled tomatoes, pureed in food processor

4 tbsp. butter

¼ cup grated parmesan

Salt and pepper to taste

Heat a large skillet or heavy bottom pot over medium-low heat.  Add minced onion and cook until very soft.  Add garlic and cook for 1 - 2 minutes.  Add crushed red pepper and pureed tomatoes.  Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally until sauce thickens slightly, about 20 minutes.  

Meanwhile, bring salted water to a boil and cook the pasta.  Reserve ½ cup pasta water.  

Whisk the butter into the tomato sauce, and add the cheese, stirring until it melts.  Add the cooked pasta, and add the pasta water if needed.  Serve with additional cheese if desired.  

 

Making Soup without a Recipe

InstructorAdrienne Ewanchyna

Emailewancha@linnbenton.edu

 


 

 

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

‘No Recipe’ Soup

 

In this class, you will learn some knife skills, as well as prepare a pot of soup.  Your soup will be different from mine, and everyone else's!  To prepare, you will need:

  1. Fat of choice (see below) ~ 3 tbsp.

  2. Stock/broth of choice - such as chicken, vegetable or beef - 8 - 12 cups.  If you’d like it creamy, sub out cream for part of this liquid.

  3. Optional: 14 oz. or 28 oz. can of diced tomatoes

  4. Optional: meat of choice - pick one: chicken breast cut into small dice, tender beef cut into small dice, ham cut into small dice, ground beef or turkey, smoked sausage cut into small dice, bulk sausage, rotisserie chicken removed from the bones and diced -  - all approximately ½ lb. or more if you like things meaty.  If you have chosen ground beef or bulk sausage, please brown it ahead.  You may reserve the fat for cooking your vegetables if you desire. 

  5. 1 onion

  6. 3 cloves garlic

  7. 2 carrots

  8. 2 - 3 more vegetable choices - vegetables that would be good cooked ~ 1 - 2 cups each

  9. Optional: Starch of choice - ex: 2 - 3 medium potatoes (red or gold), 14 oz can black beans (or other starchy bean - not green beans), ~ ½ cup barley, ~ ⅔ cup converted rice - or even a combination

  10. Herbs and spices - think about what flavor you want (see below)

  11. Salt and pepper

 

At the time of class, have your ingredients washed and at the ready (do not cut anything except your meat), a cutting board, knife (both a chef knife and paring knife is great to have), large pot, wooden spoon/something to stir with, vegetable peeler, and measuring utensils if you feel you need them.  That is it!

If you have questions in advance, you may email me at indulgencechef@gmail.com and I will do my best to answer it.  




Soup is easy to customize how you like it and make with what you have on hand.  It can be a great way to stretch or use up food, as well as show your creativity.  As long as you know the basics, you can create almost any soup without a recipe.

1) Choose a type of fat

Your soup will (probably) need to start with some type of fat, like butter or olive oil.  This is to sauté any vegetables or other initial flavors.  Pick whatever you have on hand that will mesh well with your flavors.  (I may choose olive oil if I wanted an “Italian” soup, butter if I were making a cream soup; perhaps coconut oil if I was planning something Thai...otherwise a neutral vegetable oil is a good option. If you are using a meat that will give off fat [ex: bacon, sausage], you can cook the meat first to render off the fat, remove the meat and use the fat to start cooking your vegetables)

2) Choose your base

This is the liquid you will use to make your soup, well, soupy!  What do you have on hand?  Chicken, beef, or fish stock/broth?  Tomato purée or diced tomatoes?  Cream or milk?  Choose one — or two.   Or even cream with tomato purée!  You choose the flavors you want. (just be careful to add milk products TO tomato product, which is acidic – not the other way around)  Water can be used in some cases if you have a lot of flavorful products, but know that your soup may lack some “substance”.  You can use a combination of water and stock if the soup is going to thicken up considerably (ex: using lentils or split peas).   *If you plan to add a tomato product as part of your base, and you plan to add an uncooked legume (ex: lentils, split peas), be sure to simmer to cook the legume first, then add the tomato product.  If you don’t, the legume will not soften.

3) Choose your meat (if desired)

If you want meat, that is.  Is this a chicken soup?  Ground beef (like a chili, or made into meatballs)?  Steak?  Fish?  Ham?  Sausage?  Choose whatever you like.  Think about how this will match your base (beef with fish stock might not be such a great combination), but use what you have.  Chicken stock in place of beef stock will often work just fine and won’t affect the flavor combination (so adding beef to a chicken stock-based soup, or vice versa is fine).

 

4) Choose your veggies

Onion is a pretty standard veggie because it imparts so much flavor.  Garlic, carrots, and celery are all fairly common too  - - just use what you like or what you have on hand.  There are also spinach, kale, cabbage, mushrooms, zucchini, corn, green beans, peas, and so on.  Think of vegetables that are good when cooked, versus raw (ex: lettuce, cucumber).

 

5)  Choose your starch (if desired)

Adding grains or other starches adds a nice body to a soup.  Examples such as potatoes, beans, pasta,  barley, quinoa, rice. If you are using potatoes, use a red potato or golds… they are waxy and will hold up better in a soup.  IF you add rice, think about what type of rice to add.  Converted or wild rice holds up better if you are holding the soup for any length of time.  Other rice often swells and becomes mushy.  An option if you need to hold the soup for a length of time is to cook the starch separate and add as you need the soup.  This isn’t quite as convenient, but makes for a better end product.  

5) Choose your spices

Salt and black pepper are your two most basic spices, so you will want to include them (well…at least the salt). Here are a few more popular/typical flavor combinations, but feel free to experiment.  You can also think about common flavor combinations in certain international foods if you want to give your soup a flavorful twist.

·         Celery seed, marjoram, thyme, parsley, and sage go well with typical chicken soups.

·         Marjoram, rosemary and thyme go well with beef.

·         Basil, oregano or fennel can be a nice addition to tomato-based soups.

·         Chilis need chili powder and perhaps cumin and oregano.

·         Cream soups might benefit from parsley or thyme.

 

If you are looking to give your soup a more international flair, here are some herb/spice combinations:

  • Mexican: cumin, coriander, chili powder, oregano, garlic

  • Indian:  curry, ginger, garam masala, turmeric, chile, cumin, coriander, bay, paprika

  • Mediterranean:  oregano, basil, thyme, rosemary, lemon, dill, bay

  • Thai:  chile, garlic, cumin, coriander, cilantro, basil, mint, ginger, Thai curry pastes

  • Cajun: cayenne, oregano, paprika, thyme, garlic, rosemary, bay

  • And the list goes on…. Do some research!! 

Feel free to dream up any combination you like!  Taste and adjust as you go, though!  Don’t be shy with seasoning.  Layer it… don’t start too heavy with salt.  You can always add – you can’t take away.

Once you’ve decided on what ingredients to use, making soup is very simple:

1.      Heat a large soup pot over medium heat

2.      Sauté your aromatic vegetables (onion, garlic, celery, carrot) in your fat

3.      Cook your meat if necessary (for example, stew beef).  If it is tender meat, it can be added near the end and allowed to poach in the soup.  If it is already cooked, add it at the end.

4.      Add additional veggies and spices.  Sauté a few minutes until slightly softened.

5.      Add your base (except milk or cream)

6.      Add your starch

7.      Taste and adjust

8.      Allow to simmer until vegetables and starch is tender (and meat is tender if needed).  

9.      Taste and adjust again

10.  Add any cream or milk just before serving and heat through

That’s it!  You can make any soup using the ingredients you have on hand with the flavors you prefer, without any recipe.  

Chowders and stews are slightly different in their preparation, but once you get this method down, it will open the door to understanding them and the possibilities are endless!

Pierogies! Pierogies!

Adrienne Ewanchyna

Emailewancha@linnbenton.edu

 


 

 

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

 

Homemade Pierogies 

 

In this class, we will learn how to make pierogi dough, a potato-cheese filling, learn to fill, cook and serve the pierogies. 

You can watch the class as a demonstration, and do the preparations on your own after, or you can try to cook along with me. 

If you’d like to cook along with me, there are some things you will need to do and have prepared ahead:

  1. Look at the recipe to see what ingredients you need, and have those on hand.  Read the recipe Do the preparations that are listed in bold ahead of time.

  2. Before the class, assemble the equipment listed here:

    1. 2 Medium bowls,  1 small bowl

    2. Pastry blender or fork or 2 bread knives

    3. Whisk or fork

    4. 2 Wooden spoons

    5. Clean dish towels - 2

    6. Rolling pin (if you don’t have a rolling pin, I’ve heard a piece of PVC pipe can work!)

    7. Small spoon

    8. Cookie sheets - 2 or 3

    9. Parchment paper or wax paper

    10. Small saute pan/skillet

    11. Large pot filled with salted water (if you want to cook them, I’d suggest getting your water heated)

    12. Slotted spoon

    13. Another fork… for eating!! :) 

 

If you have questions prior to the class, I will try to answer them - please email me at indulgencechef@gmail.com.

 

Pierogies

 

Filling:

3 lb. russet potatoes

¼ cup butter

 ~ 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese

Salt and pepper

 

Dough:

3 cups flour

½ cup butter, cut into cubes

1 egg

2 tbsp sour cream

~⅔ cup water from the boiled potatoes

 

To serve:

½ cup butter

½ onion, diced

Sour cream

 

Filling:  Peel and cut the potatoes and place in a pot and cover with water.  Add ~ 1 tsp. Salt to the water.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat and low boil until soft and tender.  Drain well, reserving the cooking water for the dough. Allow the water to cool (put in the fridge if needed).  Add the butter to the pot; add back the potatoes and begin to mash.  Taste the potatoes.  Add enough salt to make them somewhat salty.  Add pepper and sprinkle in the cheese.  Continue to mash until combined and thoroughly mashed.  (I find it easier to work with if I transfer this to a bowl.) Cover lightly and set aside.  **Plan to do this just before the class

 

Dough:  Place the flour in a medium bowl.  Add the butter Using a pastry blender, fork or bread knives - cut the butter into the flour until crumbly.  Measure the potato cooking water into a small bowl.  Whisk in the sour cream and egg.  Stir the water mixture into the flour and begin to work together to form a dough.  Use a wooden spoon if needed, then work with your hands until it comes together.  

Lay a dish towel on the counter.  Take small portions of the dough and roll balls ~ ¾” in size.  Place balls on the towel.  Continue until all the dough is used up.  Cover with another towel to let rest. 

 

Assembly:  Prepare a cookie sheet by lining with parchment of wax paper.  Take a ball and roll it out on the counter to ~ 2” diameter.  Pick it up and place it in the palm of your hand.  Using a small spoon, scoop ~ 1 tbsp of the filling and place in the center of the dough.  Bring the edges together and pinch the edges well.  You may have to tuck the filling in, or stretch the dough over the filling a bit.  This dough is quite forgiving.  Be sure to get a good seal and the filling is not preventing that, because the pierogi will leak if it’s not well sealed.   Place the pierogi on the prepared cookie sheet and continue with the remaining balls.  You may need additional cookie sheets, or, place sheets of parchment between layers of pierogies.  Do not do more than 3 layers. 

 

Cooking:  Melt the butter in a small saute pan.  Add the onion and saute in the butter until quite soft.  Keep warm.  

Start a large pot of salted water to boil.  Once the water is boiling, drop 10 - 15 pierogies in the boiling water.  After ~ 2 minutes, give a light stir to the water.  Once the pierogies float, let them cook for at least 1 more minute, then remove with a slotted spoon to a bowl.  Continue with remaining pierogies.  As pierogies come out of the water, toss with some of the onion butter to prevent sticking.

 

To serve:  Traditionally, pierogies are served with sour cream. 

 

If you decide to make pierogies for freezing, there are a few ways you can do this:

  1. Layer them raw in single layers on cookie sheets and freeze raw.  When frozen, place into bags. Boil from frozen until they float for 2 - 3 minutes.  (sometimes this method can cause the dough to crack - although my recipe is pretty forgiving - so while less convenient, many people opt for option 2 or 3)

  2. Blanch the pierogies by boiling for only 30 seconds.  Place on a sheet pan until cool, toss with a touch of oil to prevent sticking and place into bags to freeze.  Boil from frozen until they float for 2 - 3 minutes.

  3. Cook the pierogies completely.  Place on a sheet pan until cool, toss with a touch of oil to prevent sticking and place into bags to freeze.  Because they are completely cooked, they benefit from different ways of reheating.  My favorite way is to place them in a skillet, pour cream over top and simmer until the cream is absorbed and the pierogies are crispy on the bottom!  

 

There are several other flavorings that can be added to the mashed potatoes if you go that route.  Some are more traditional, such as a farmers or cottage cheese, green onion, or bacon.

However, there are many types of alternative fillings for pierogies, such as sauerkraut, mushrooms, meat, and even berries for a dessert pierogi!

 

Roll Your Own Summer/Fresh Roll

Lily Bender

Emailbenderl@linnbenton.edu

 


 


Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


Summer/Fresh Roll & Peanut Sauce


Summer Rolls or Gỏi Cuốn:


  • Rice Paper or Banh Trang (1 pack)

  • Rice Vermicelli (1 pack)

  • Shrimp or Tofu (½ lb) 

  • Leaf lettuce (1 large head) 

  • Mint (1 bunch)

  • Thai basil (1 bunch) 


Peanut Sauce: 

  • Peanut Butter (½ cup) 

  • Soy sauce (¼ cup) 

  • Rice Vinegar (1 tbsp) 

  • Brown Sugar (2 tbsp) 

  • Garlic (1-2 cloves) 

Hawaii “Plate Lunch“ Loco Moco

Lily Bender

Emailbenderl@linnbenton.edu

 


 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


Loco Moco & Mac Salad


Loco Moco

  • Short Grain White Rice (2 cups) 


  • Hamburger (1 lb) 

  • Onion (1 EA) 

  • Japanese Breadcrumbs (½ cup) 

  • Egg (1 EA) 

  • Worcestershire sauce (1 tbsp) 


  • Green onions (1 bunch) 

  • Eggs (4 EA)


  • Mushrooms (10 EA) 

  • Beef stock (1 ½ cups) 

  • Soy sauce (1 tsp) 

  • Worcestershire sauce (1 tsp) 

  • Corn starch (1 tbsp) 


Macaroni Salad

  • Elbow macaroni (½ lb)

  • Apple cider vinegar (1 tbsp) 

  • Carrot (1 EA) 

  • Onion (¼ cup) 

  • Salt

  • Pepper 


  • Oil 

Baked Goodies for Fall

Jo Ann Yonemura

Emailyonemuj@linnbenton.edu

 


 Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.


Cream Scones

(adapted from a Food Network recipe)

I found this recipe about 6 years ago and I entered it at the Linn County Fair and it placed First

Place. Scones are a quick bake and very easy to make. They make a great accompaniment to

tea and coffee. The only thing you need to remember is to have a light hand with them and don’t

over knead the dough!  This recipe makes 16 small scones. 


Preheat the oven to 425°.


Equipment:

  • 1 sheet pan (large enough to fit 16 scones)

  • Parchment paper

  • Set of dry measuring cups, set of measuring spoons and liquid measuring cup

  • 1 large bowl, a whisk and a fork

  • Pastry mat or a large cutting board

  • Cooling rack(s) 

  • Sharp knife and a platter

  • Pastry brush, small dish to hold melted butter, small dish to hold sugar

  • 2 cups of flour

  • 1 Tbsp baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/4 cup sugar

  • 3/4 cup of dried fruit, nuts or chocolate or white chocolate chips

  • 1 1/4 cup of heavy cream (do not substitute)

1. In a large bowl, combine the first five ingredients and using fork, mix well. Add your fruit,

nuts or chips. Using a fork, stir in cream and mix until dough holds together in a rough

mass. Tip: Do NOT overmix​.

2. Lightly flour a board, transfer dough from bowl to cutting board. Knead 8-9 times. Tip:

Use a light touch and do NOT over knead dough or it will be flat and hard after you bake

it! Divide the dough and pat into 2 circles about 6 inches round.  Using a knife, cut into

wedges (8 each = 16 scones). If you are using a pastry mat, transfer the circles onto a

cutting board first before slicing into wedges.


Glaze

3 Tbsp butter, melted

2 Tbsp sugar


3. In a small dish, melt butter in the microwave using 10 second increments until the butter

is melted.  Cool slightly. Using pastry brush, brush the melted butter on the tops of the

wedges. Place the sugar in a small dish and sprinkle the sugar evenly over the wedges.

Place each piece on a parchment lined baking sheet, with a 1" allowance between

pieces. 


4. Bake for 11 minutes - scones will be light on top but the bottom of the scones will be

golden brown.


My favorite sweet combinations:

dried diced apricots and hazelnuts

dried cherries and semi-sweet chocolate chips

dried blueberries and white chocolate chips

white chocolate chips and macadamia nuts

dried cranberries and walnuts

milk chocolate chips and pecans


My favorite savory combinations:

cheddar cheese and chives

diced ham, cheddar cheese and scallions

gruyere cheese, prosciutto and chives


 


 


Apple Galette 

(adapted from Julia and Jacques Cooking At Home) 

Julia Child and Jacques Pepin are the best French chefs in my book! I have learned much from watching many Julia Child episodes. This galette or free-form pie will have you saying Bon Appetit, just like Julia! You can make small galettes or one big galette with this recipe -- just adjust your pie dough to the size you want! One large galette when cut yields about 12 pieces. 

Equipment: Small saucepan, wooden spoon, pastry brush and a wire sieve (optional) 

Bowl, rolling pin and Pastry mat (optional) Large 17 by 14 inches (preferable) cookie sheet, rimless if possible A wooden cutting board, knife, apple peeler (optional) Pastry blender or a food processor (optional) Plastic wrap, a ziplock bag, parchment paper 

Pie Filling: 2 1⁄4 pounds of apples - Golden Delicious or other apples such as Granny Smith, 

Rome Beauty or McIntosh (5 or 6 medium apples) 

1⁄2 cup dried currants (raisins are good substitutes) 1⁄2 cup dried apricots cut into 1⁄2” pieces 1 tsp. cinnamon 1⁄4 cup of sugar 

1. Prepare the apples! Peel and core the apples. Slice apples in half from stem to bottom 

and then slice into 1⁄2” pieces. Toss apple pieces into the bowl and with the currants, apricot pieces,cinnamon and sugar, coating them well. Set aside. 

Flaky Pastry: 2 cups flour 

7 oz. unsalted butter (1 1⁄4 stick), chilled and cut into 1⁄2” pieces 1 Tbsp. vegetable shortening 1⁄2 tsp of salt 1⁄2 tsp of sugar 1⁄3 cup of ice cold water, plus more if needed 

2. Prepare the pastry dough. Place the flour, butter pieces, shortening, salt and sugar in a work bowl of the food processor. Blend using short second-long bursts, pulsing the machine 8 or 9 times. Uncover and check the consistency - the dough should be crumbly, with butter broken up into small but still visible pieces, about 1⁄4” or so. Add all but a Tablespoon of water through the feed tube of the machine, and immediately pulse 3 to 4 times, no more than 5 seconds in all. Feel the dough and press some in your hand to see whether it clumps together and is evenly moist. If it does not adhere, add another spoonful of water and pulse for another second or two. Don’t overmix so that the dough clumps together in the center. 



(If you do not have a food processor, place all ingredients in a bowl and use a pastry blender and follow the same process above until the dough comes together). Spread out a large sheet of plastic wrap and turn the loose dough onto it. Lift up the sides of the plastic, gathering the dough together, then fold the wrap over and press the dough into a single compact mass. If some dry bits don’t adhere, sprinkle with drops of water and press them together. The dough can be used right away if necessary but will benefit from refrigerated rest for an hour or two. Wrap tightly in the plastic wrap, pressing it into a flat disk shape and enclose in a plastic bag. Refrigerate until needed. Dough that will not be used within a day or two should be stored in the freezer, where it’ll keep for several weeks. 

3. Preheat the oven to 400°. 

Making the glaze (select one): Jacques’ glaze Julia’s glaze 

1 cup apricot jam 1 cup apricot jam 2 Tbsp Calvados or cognac 2 Tbsp. sugar 

1-2 Tbsp. Grand Marnier Directions for Jacques’ glaze: Put the strained or unstrained jam in a bowl with Calvados or cognac and stir gently with a spoon until mixed. 

Directions for Julia’s glaze: Place jam in the saucepan and set over low heat to melt. Sieve the jam into a bowl, then scrape it back into the saucepan. You can use the Apricot bits in the apple filling, or toss. Stir sugar into the warm jam, heat to a boil and cook rapidly for a couple of minutes to thicken. Scoop up a bit of the hot glaze with a spoon and let it fall back into the pan; when the last drops fall very slowly and almost form threads the glaze is done.Remove the heat and let cool for a few minutes then stir in the Grand Marnier. 

(If you prefer to omit liquor, you can warm up the apricot jam in a saucepan. Warm up the jam, stir until you have a good spreading consistency. Spread on the pastry dough and top of the fruit.) 

4. Rolling the dough: Set the disk of dough on a floured work surface (pastry mat) and dust 

the top with flour. If the dough is chilled and hard, bang the rolling pin against it several times to soften and get it moving. Roll the dough into an oval, occasionally turning it over and rotating it on the work surface and keeping both sides well floured. Continue to roll out until the dough is about 3⁄8” thick and the oval is about 18” long and 15” wide. Patch any cracks or any uneven edges with dough trimmed from the long end. To transfer dough, roll it up around the rolling pin starting at the narrow end and unfurl it centered onto the baking sheet. Don’t worry if edges are over the edge of the pan, you’ll fold those edges into pleats. 

5. Forming and baking the tart: Brush the center of the dough with a thin layer of warm 

glaze, leaving a 2” margin unglazed all around. Place the apple mixture on top of the glazed area and spread it in a thick even layer over the pastry within 2” of the edge. Lift the edge of the pastry all around and press it over the apples, making pleats in the dough. Dot the top of the fruit with the 2 Tbsp of butter and sprinkle sugar on the pastry border to give it more color. Place tart in the oven and bake for an hour until the dough is nicely browned and the apple chunks are soft. 

6. Glazing and serving the tart: You may glaze the fruit and serve the tart while warm or let 

it cool to room temperature. Shake the baking sheet slightly just after removing it from the oven to prevent the tart from becoming glued by caramelized fruit juices.When it has cooled, slide the tart onto a wooden cutting board for slicing.

 


 


Pear Upside-Down Loaf Cake 

(recipe adapted from Bake From Scratch- Artisan Recipes for the Home Baker, Volume Two) 

This recipe reminds me of the pineapple upside down cakes that I used to make in Hawai’i. In the Pacific Northwest, we are fortunate to have delicious, fresh pears during the fall months. The recipe calls for Forelle pears but you can use small Bosc or Anjou pears as a substitute. Makes 1 loaf. Preheat the oven to 350°. 

Equipment: 1 10x5 loaf pan (glass or metal) Parchment paper Small piece of waxed paper or parchment Set of dry measuring cups, set of measuring spoons and liquid measuring cup 1 medium bowl and a whisk Stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment or hand mixer with beater attachment Wooden toothpick or skewer or cake tester Sharp knife and a platter 

A little extra softened unsalted butter and about 2 Tbsps of flour 

1. Prepare the loaf pan by laying a sheet of parchment over the pan. Use a little softened 

butter and a piece of either parchment paper or waxed paper and spread butter over the entire surface of the parchment paper and up the short sides of the loaf pan. Measure 2 Tbsps of flour to coat the pan, distributing it evenly. Dispose of extra flour. 

2 miniature or small pears peeled, cored and halved lengthwise. 

2. Prep the pears. Peel, core and remove seeds and cut pears in half lengthwise.Cut a 1⁄2 

inch slice off rounded side of each pear. 

1⁄2 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter, cubed 

3. Sprinkle brown sugar and cubed butter in the prepared pan. Place the pan in the oven 

until butter is melted, about 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. Place pears core side down and alternating narrow ends. 

1⁄2 cup unsalted butter, softened 2⁄3 cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 1⁄4 cups self-rising flour 1⁄4 baking soda 1⁄2 cup whole buttermilk 1 tsp of cinnamon 

4. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat softened butter and 

granulated sugar until fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add eggs, one at a time beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla extract. 

5. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and cinnamon. With the mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with the buttermilk, beginning and ending with the flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Spread batter over pears. 

6. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Let 

cool in the pan for 2 minutes. Run a sharp knife around the edges of the cake to loosen. Carefully invert cake onto a serving platter. Slice and serve immediately. 


 


 


Pumpkin Cake With Browned Butter Streusel (adapted from Bake From Scratch, Volume One) 

I love pumpkin and spice! Browning the butter gives this coffee cake a subtle caramel flavor. This coffee cake screams Fall! 

Equipment: 1 9-inch round cake pan and baking spray with flour 

Parchment paper, cut to fit the pan Set of dry measuring cups, set of measuring spoons and liquid measuring cup 1 medium bowl, a whisk, an offset spatula Small saucepan and a wooden spoon Standing mixer with paddle attachment or hand mixer with beater attachment Cooling rack, sharp knife and a platter 

Streusel: 5 Tablespoons unsalted butter 3⁄4 cups of flour 1⁄2 cup, roasted, salted shelled pepitas (pumpkin seeds) 1⁄4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1⁄4 cup sugar 1⁄2 tsp kosher salt 

1. In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Cook butter until it turns a 

medium brown color and has a nutty aroma, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. 

2. Using the pan as a template, cut a circle of parchment paper to fit inside the pan. Spray 

the pan with baking spray.and line with the parchment paper circle. 

3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, pepitas, sugars, and salt. Drizzle with browned 

butter, and stir with a wooden spoon until combined. Crumble with your fingertips until desired consistency of streusel is reached. 

4. Preheat the oven to 350°. 

Cake: 1⁄2 cup unsalted butter 

2 cups granulated sugar 1⁄4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 2 large eggs 1 15 oz. can pumpkin 1 2⁄3 cup flour 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp grated fresh nutmeg (or you may substitute ground nutmeg) 1 tsp kosher salt 1⁄2 tsp baking soda
1⁄2 tsp baking powder 1⁄2 tsp ground ginger 1⁄2 cup whole milk 

5. In the bowl of the standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment beat the butter and 

sugars at medium high speed until combined, .5 to 7 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of the bowl. Reduce mixer speed to low; add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add pumpkin, beating just until combined. 

6. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, baking soda, baking 

powder and ginger. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Pour batter into prepared pan, smoothing top with an offset spatula. Sprinkle with streusel. 

7. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes to an hour. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Run a sharp knife around the edge of cake to loosen sides. Invert onto a plate and then invert again onto a wire rack. Let cool completely. 

 

 

 

Fitness & Dance

Better Bones & Balance: various

Various Instructors:  Brown, Davenport, Farrar, Hourmanesh-Jones, Pozzesi, Walker, Whipple 

 


Suggested equipment:  
If you do not have some of this equipment at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with what you do have.


Suggested Equipment List 

  • * Resistance bands - medium to heavy preferred - 4’-5’ depending on your height

  • * A set or two of hand weights/dumbbells - one light and/or one heavier

    • Alternatives:  jugs of water, weighted totes, cans of food, etc.

  • Sturdy chair

  • Fitness mat, towel, or blanket for the floor

  • Handled resistance tube

  • Loop band

  • Step/Bench (use only approved fitness steps/benches for your safety)

  • Weighted Vest

  • Physio ball

  • Small inflatable ball

  • Heavy duty dowel or wooden stick (broom stick or yard stick)

  • Access to a wall



* Items that should be prioritized if you can obtain them.  All other items are not needed, unless you already have them.

 

 

 

Home & DIY

Intro to Amigurumi

InstructorMonica McKirdy

Email: mckirdm@linnbenton.edu

 


 Suggested supplies:  If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.You will need one or two skeins of your main color, and one skein of your contrast color. You can use what you have on hand as long as it is a medium weight (4) yarn. You’ll also need small amounts of yarn for the head knobs, antennae, and face. I have linked to Joann’s website, but you can get it wherever you like to buy your supplies. If you choose to buy yarn, it is better to do it sooner than later due to scarcity. 

 

Suggested supplies:  

 

  • Size H-8/5mm crochet hook (Here at Joann.com)

  • Red Heart Super Saver yarn in color of your choice. You’ll need one or two skeins. What color do you want your robot to be? The body of your robot will be this color. (Here at Joann.)

  • Red Heart Super Saver yarn in color of your choice. For the arms and legs. Make sure it’s a good contrast color. One skein will do.

  • What color do you want the ear knobs, and the antennae? If you have a yarn stash at home, you might already have enough in whatever color you’d choose! Otherwise, pick up a skein of red, or maybe orange!

  • Black yarn to stitch on a smile. (It doesn’t take much!)

  • Two large black buttons for the eyes. (Here at Joann.)

  • Yarn needle for assembly and stitching details. (Here at Amazon—I couldn’t find them on Joann’s website, but I know they have them in the store!)

  • Two or three sheets of plastic canvas. (Here at Joann.)


You also need a Google account (Gmail) so you can be added to the Google Classroom.



Please have your supplies ready to go by the first day of class! Contact me with any questions or concerns at the email listed above. 

 

 

 
 

Nature & Outdoor

Wilderness Survival Series

Jeremiah Stark

Emailstarkj@linnbenton.edu

 


 


Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.  Students will have a space set up inside, or outside for themselves that will allow for necessary content learning. (Prep and materials needed will be included in participant email) students will need to purchase basic items: 

 

  • 5x7’ tarp, or similar size.

  • magnesium/ferro rod

  • waterproof matches or lighter

  • 3’ x 1/2“ pine,fir, or poplar wood dowel (hand drill)

  • You’ll need a 1’x6’’x1/2’’ plank of cedar fencing. (fire board) 

  • sheath knife. Blade length 4” minimum

  • 50 ft of 550 parachute cord.


Instructor delivery will be in the proper environment for better simulation. (i.e) forest, fire pit, river, field etc.